CALL OF THE MALL PACO UNDERHILL PDF

Paco Underhill’s informal book Call of the Mall is like a trip to the mall with several different customers and features conversations with salespeople and with . Call of the Mall has ratings and 87 reviews. Anina said: This is a pretty neat book. The guy who wrote it is a professional who observes people in ma. Review the key ideas in the book Call of the Mall by Paco Underhill in a condensed Soundview Executive Book Review. Summaries & book reviews of the year’s.

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Return to Book Page. Preview — Call of underholl Mall by Paco Underhill. Call of the Mall: The Geography of Shopping by Paco Underhill. Paco Underhill, the Margaret Mead of shopping and author of the huge international bestseller Why We Buynow takes us to the mall, a uneerhill every American has experienced and has an opinion about. Paperbackpages. Published January 3rd by Simon Schuster first published February 2nd To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about Call of the Mallplease sign up. Lists with This Book. Oct 14, Anina rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a pretty neat book. The guy who wrote it is a professional who observes people in malls and then develops marketing strategies. It was more about sociology, about how people act in malls, than it was about evil marketing strategies.

It was very interesting to see all that goes into malls and the psychological reactions people have. The chapters are short and easy to read, not too science-y. Sep 11, Kelsey rated it liked it Shelves: Given to me by my boss at a customer experience consulting firm. Underhill has some great, if not obvious, insights.

I read the book all the way through and agreed with most of it, though Underhil bristled with some of the generalizations mostly those ths to do with gender. A good ubderhill for anyone who is iterested in malls as public spaces. Sep 30, Joanne rated it it was ok Shelves: Why We Buy] so much, I was looking forward to another from Underhill. But this one just isn’t as interesting. A lot of history of the shopping mall and commentary on it as a social phenomenon.

The book is best when Underhill takes along fellow shoppers three teens, a middle-aged man unferhill just lets the tape run. The rest is a bit of a yawn. Mar 26, Emily Leathers rated it it was paaco Shelves: A surprisingly good pacl. I got this one from the shelf at work. It is an entirely merciless review of everything done right and wrong by malls – American and worldwide – from the retailing point of view.

Quick, well written, and full of lines to make you smile. Dec 22, Stephen rated it really liked it Shelves: Paco Underhill wants to take a little walk with you through the local mall, to see it with his eyes- the eyes of a “retail anthropologist” and marketing strategist who scrutinizes malls as the environments they were built to be: Born amid the automobile-guided infrastructure buildout of the s, shopping malls have been the crown jewel of Undeghill consumerism, dedicated spaces of recreational consumption of goods.

Call of the Mall

The walk, which begins in the parking lot oc travels through t Paco Underhill wants to take a little walk with you through the local mall, to see it with his eyes- the eyes of a “retail anthropologist” and marketing strategist who scrutinizes malls as the environments they were built to be: The walk, which begins in the parking lot and travels through the cavernous mall’s innards, going even down the twisty hallways into the hidden bathrooms, takes reader on a guided tour of the territory, where even toilets don’t escape scrutiny.

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Written more for consumers than business students, it’s an entertaining account that offers most another perspective on shopping malls.

Although Underbill spends most of his working life walking around malls, his feelings regarding them are mixed. He seems to enjoy them — the long stretches of flat marble or tile, air-conditioned walks down channels filled with eye-catching displays and even more eye-catching people — but his job requires being both appreciative and critical. Throughout the mall tour, Underhill’s perspective reveals that for all their flashiness, malls do a inderhill things badly.

Music stores, for instance, have gone downhill since records gave way to CDs, because record sleeves could be used as eye-catching displays.

CD covers are as useful for displays seen at a distance as postage stamps. Underhill is also surprised that no store has ever considered using the mall restrooms as a display area for its own equipment but considering how much volume mall toilets get, would any retailer want to chance his toilet being tue with badly-maintained restrooms?

There are greater problems, too, unavoidable consequences of the malls’ status as artifacts of suburbia. Malls are in fact very artificial environments, little island awash in a sea of pavements.

A lot of their foot traffic is from teenagers who are there because they have nothing else to do; suburban teens have no place outside of home and school to go to. Underhill makes the point repeatedly that malls are limited tue their environment. In revealing what malls don’t do well, Underhill also points out their strengths, and explains to readers, uniitated shoppers, why they might work the way they do.

Call of the Mall – Paco Underhill – Google Books

He points out, for instance, that the spaces near entrances and exits are consigned as low rent. One would think otherwise considering they receive greater traffic than the interior of the mall, but Underhill comments that as people are entering a store, they need space to adjust, to adapt to their new environment. Paoc they are making the transition, their mind ignores the first few stores they pass. He underhil elaborates on some of the strategies that the real estate giants who own the malls employ when deciding who rents what space; different stores have different markets, and there are dynamics to be taken into consideration.

A low-end and a high-end jewelry store side by side can enhance one another’s business. Shopping malls are a mixed bag, an experiment in retailing that may change as time passes, or may fail entirely. Demographics are changing, writes Undernill, as is technology; online stores are giving brick-and-mortar or in suburban cases, plywood and concrete an increasingly hard time, and this work was penned ten years ago, before Amazon Prime and similar services.

The Call of the Mall will probably frustrate marketing students looking for a catalog of tricks of the trade, because while Underbill offers general suggestions and reveals a few practices, he’s not going to give away the farm considering he makes a living as a consultant helping businesses organize their physical space. For the ordinary person on the street — or in the aisles — The Call of the Mall is an entertaining look into the workings of places we might spend a lot of our time in.

Nov 20, Dave rated it liked it. This has been on my list for so long that it was satisfying to finally find it. Then it was a satisfying read too.

It felt outdated, even with the chapter on post-mall culture, but not so outdated that I don’t remember mall culture well and with a mixture of fondness and annoyance.

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The most memorable item: Perfume counters are located in most department stores in their front and center location because they were used to block out the horse smell from the streets way back when.

An interesting read, but dated. Published mzllbefore the introduction of the iPhone and other smart phones, a lot of the information and conclusions do not really apply to shopping today.

The history of the development of the shopping mall was informative. Jun 23, Harvey rated it it was amazing. Underhill pioneered an entire science surrounding studying consumer behaviour. Underhill describes the history of the shopping mall, its culture, economics, faults, des – another interesting book by the best-known, global expert on the anthropology of shopping Underhill describes the history of the shopping mall, its culture, economics, faults, design, future, etc.

The products never go on sale. The other day I came upon a huddle of sophisticated young Manhattan women shivering outdoors on udnerhill coldest day of the year while waiting in line underhlil the Manolo Blahnik sale.

So instead of sales, the cosmetics manufacturers offer something known as gift-with-purchase: This gift-with-purchase system has been in place for some 30 years now. But the industry has found that if a gift contains three free items, the customer will use perhaps two of them, and return to buy just one. I was hoping this book have some insight like the chapter on malls in Douglas Rushkoff’s Coercion or Naomi Klein’s discussion of malls as private vs public space in No Logo.

The author makes some good observations about the development of malls and people’s behavior in them, but doesn’t seem interested in thoughtful discussion.

THE CALL OF THE MALL: A Walking Tour Through the Crossroads of Our Shopping Culture

Instead he uses his data to make sweeping generalizations based on gender, age, and income. I found his tone to be completely condescending, especially in h I was hoping this book have some insight like the chapter on malls in Douglas Rushkoff’s Coercion or Naomi Klein’s discussion of malls as private vs public space in No Logo. I found his tone to be completely condescending, especially in his explanations of how and why women shop. I’m a woman, and I do shop in malls, but I don’t identify with any of his explanations of how women shop.

It seems he ignores any behavior that doesn’t fit into the boxes of his preconceived ideas. There are many shoppers that don’t fit into his ideal molds, but he is unconcerned with looking at anything other than the status quo.

The way the book was written also became annoying really fast. He has several ‘conversations’ with random mall shoppers, all of whom fit his stereotypes of shoppers and mall staff. All of these characters just serve to echo his own ideas back to him, and I guess are supposed to reinforce the ideas in the reader’s mind as being true. It all sounded phony and forced. Tthe lot of his ideas seemed impractical and don’t convey an understanding of the social and psychological function of malls as they presently exist.

Oct 18, Nick rated it really liked it Shelves: Underhill and his operatives tye things that no one else does and explain them in the simplest of terms.

In Call of the Underihllthe founder of Envirosell turns his attentions to everything about the shopping mall, and his observations are stunning. However I have to agree with other reviewers here that this book is not as solid as the first.